How to Fill Out Form I-90

By Mary Jane Freeman
You, Form I-90, mail, online

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If you reached for your green card recently and discovered that it was missing, you can get a replacement card by filing Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card, with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services either by mail or online. You can also get a replacement card for other reasons, such as if it's stolen or it's about to expire. Depending on why you need the replacement, the application fee can range from zero to several hundred dollars. If you're a conditional permanent resident, you can't use Form I-90 to remove, extend or renew your conditional status.

Form I-90 Consists of Six Parts

Use part 1 of Form I-90 to provide information about yourself, such as your alien registration number and the date you were granted permanent resident status. In part 2, explain why you're submitting Form I-90, which might be because your card was lost or stolen, you never received it, or it contains erroneous information. In part 3, you must identify the location of the U.S. Embassy, U.S. Consulate or USCIS office where you applied for your green card and the location where it was actually granted. If you require accommodations due to a disability or impairment, provide this information in section 4. In section 5, sign and date the form and provide a contact number. If someone prepares the form for you, that person provides information in part 6.

File by Mail or Electronically

If you're mailing Form I-90, visit uscis.gov or call customer service at 800-375-5283 to determine the appropriate mailing address, as this can sometimes change. While you can also file Form I-90 electronically, in some cases, such as if you need a replacement card because you never received the original one or if the one you have contains errors made by USCIS, you can only file it by mail.

About the Author

Based on the West Coast, Mary Jane Freeman has been writing professionally since 1994, specializing in the topics of business and law. Freeman's work has appeared in a variety of publications, including LegalZoom, Essence, Reuters and Chicago Sun-Times. Freeman holds a Master of Science in public policy and management and Juris Doctor. Freeman is self-employed and works as a policy analyst and legal consultant.