How to Fight a Speeding Ticket

By Alicia Bodine
A police officer, a speeding ticket
Getty Images

Speeding tickets can be quite costly. They not only come with a large fine, but they also raise your insurance premiums. Did you know that you can fight your speeding ticket and at the least receive a lesser charge that doesn't result in points on your insurance? The lesser charge will also come with a smaller fine. The worst that can happen is the judge denies your claim and you are stuck with the speeding ticket. It's worth a try.

Check the box on the ticket that says you want your hearing. Mail the ticket to the court, but make sure you write down the court date on the ticket first. Put that court date on your calendar and get ready for it.

Wear professional attire such as a suit or dress. This shows the judge respect and that you take court proceedings of any kind seriously. If you go to court with ripped jeans and a T-shirt, don't be surprised if the judge throws the book at you.

Show up to court early or at least on time. Showing up late tells the judge you are not responsible -- which would encourage him or her to believe that you really were, indeed, speeding. Showing up early may also get you in as one of the first cases. The judge will not have had time to get aggravated yet, so he or she may be more lenient and willing to knock down your ticket to a lesser charge.

Have a pleasant demeanor. This is so important. If you go before a judge with an attitude, you are going to get an attitude back. Try to explain your situation and side of the story calmly and clearly and without blaming anyone. Don't say that the radar gun must not have been working or that the officer was mean (he will be there). Just state your case, what you were doing, where you were going and how fast you believe you were going there. Speaking pleasantly will cause the judge's heart to soften and, even if you are guilty, he or she will probably reduce your fine.

Plead not guilty. This will allow you to see the judge so that you can get your ticket lowered or dismissed. If you have been pleasant, dressed appropriately and on time and the judge still throws the book at you, request a trial. The judge should then negotiate with you because trials cost a lot of money. The judge isn't going to want to spend thousands of dollars on a trial for a $100 speeding ticket. Don't be afraid to ask for a trial; you have that right.

Use the National Motorists Association to help you fight the speeding ticket. They charge $3 per month to become a member, but the help you can get from them can save you $100 in fines, plus another $200 in car insurance premiums. If you feel that you might not be able to fight this ticket on your own, sign up for the National Motorists Association at the link below.

About the Author

Alicia Bodine has been a professional writer for six years. She has produced thousands of articles for online publications such as Demand Studios, Bright Hub, Associated Content and WiseGeek. Bodine is also the current cooking guru for LifeTips. She has received awards for being a top content producer.