How to Find Out if You Received a Ticket at a Photo Enforced Intersection

By Charong Chow
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Some American cities have installed red light photo enforcement cameras in specific high traffic intersections. According to the City of San Diego, it costs $450,000 per year, as of 2011, to place police officers at a single intersection to monitor cars who have run red lights. Red light photo cameras are cost efficient and save lives. If you ran a red light and you saw the camera flash, you can find out if you received a ticket at a photo enforced intersection so you can deal with the violation.

Wait for your ticket. In some cities, such as Napa in California, violators receive the ticket within 15 days. In other locations, it might take longer. The registered owner of the vehicle receives the violation in the mail to the registered address.

Contact the registered owner of the car, if you were driving someone else's car while running the red light. They may have already received the ticket. In some cities, the owner of the vehicle fills out a "Affidavit of Non-Liability" form stating they were not the driver of the car at the time of the violation. They can point the blame to another driver.

Check with websites Photonotice or Violation Info. Some cities post violations and pictures of violators online through third-party websites. You can review the information and photographs.

Call, email or check the website of your local city police if you do not receive anything in the mail. You can ask the station if they have information about a particular intersection's red light violations.

Schedule an appointment with your local police to check if you received a red light photo enforced violation. You can also view footage of your violation. They should have photographs of the car passing the line on a red light, the car in the middle of the intersection and its license plate.

About the Author

Charong Chow has been writing professionally since 1995. Her work has appeared in magazines such as "Zing" and "Ocean Drive." Chow graduated from the University of Miami with a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy. She also received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the California Institute of the Arts.